“Decoding Da Vinci“ by N.T. Wright

After having read “The Gospel of Thomas” translated by Svein Woje & Kari Klepp., I asked the local vicar if he had any reading material regarding the numerous conspiracies surrounding the Christian church.

He lent me a 28-page pamphlet authored by Rt Revd N.T. Wright.

An interesting question posed by the author to his readership regarding “The Da Vinci Code“ is this: What questions did it raise for you in relation to Christian belief?

I did not have any questions regarding Dan Brown’s claims at all when I first read it for the simple reason that it has become pretty much cannon in Norway that the sanctity of Jesus was decided during the church meeting at Nicea. Norwegians also subscribe to the belief that the books chosen for The New Testament were picked for political reasons, which means that many people in Norway know about the non-canonical gospels and perceive their exclusion as the result of politics.

Since this had already been presented to me as truth repeatedly I saw Dan Brown’s book as a confirmation of an already established fact.

I went out and bought myself “Holy Blood and Holy Grail,“ which I then took as further evidence.

All of this ties neatly together with pop-Satanists and modern pagans who are hard at work to clean up negative PR surrounding their spiritual practises that according to them was/is the result of Christian propaganda.

Due to this it is very difficult to come across books about witchcraft or Satanism that aren’t apologetic in nature….

I sincerely doubt that relevant or good reading material can be found about the topic in any mainstream book shop or at any state funded library….

As a teenager I tried but couldn’t find much of interest.

I was mystified when I read that Jimmy Page apparently had an occult book shop in London once upon a time. Where on earth he could find enough material to justify a book store puzzles me.

All you come across are excuses and attempts at making the Christian churches in Europe look like oppressors making life impossible for other faiths; that of course are always depicted as harmless.

Much emphasis is put on the burning of Witches and what a horrible event this was in human history since there are no such things as witches – just like there are no such things as demons or dark spirits. 

Funny enough this alleged modern “enlightened“ way of looking at things is contradicted by polls where it is claimed that most people claim to have a belief in a God and/or the spiritual, there is no shortage of books about Angels and the paranormal, yet “witches“ or the “spiritual“ is a thing of the past.

Superstition led to the “black-magic-hysteria“ in old-times, now we are simply too smart and too good for these things.

Any modern-day books about spirituality coming from mediums or from anyone who has experienced an NDE will only talk about love, exclusively, without ever mentioning the darker aspects of spiritual experiences; such as hauntings, possessions, poltergeist activity, etc;

The topic of “dark magic“ or “dark spirituality“ can only be found in Hollywood movies, even though spiritual dark activity is well-documented historically. Even if looking at old myths and spiritual beliefs, there was always an acknowledgment of darker elements.

This is remarkably absent from modern-day “everything is just fine“ spirit-literature.

Ironically enough it is relatively easy to buy Tarot cards or Ouija boards or any other tools associated with “magic,“ but books about the topic cannot be found easily unless you are satisfied with the narrative of: “the Church is actually the bad guy and we are really the good guys.“

Satanism also gets a make-over with people claiming that it is all about self-development,  statements that seem dubious when considering the celebration of self-mutilation, suicide, murder and other destructive activities that can be found in so-called alternative circles.

When reading about pagan rituals involving human sacrifice in Nordic cultures in addition to revelations disclosing that the Vikings were very active when it came to slave trading, the modern myth of pagan-Scandinavia being peaceful, tolerant, egalitarian, and whatnot becomes dubious at best.

“Peaceful traders“ does not count if it involves the kidnapping and selling of other humans (a capital accumulated due to merciless raids and plundering), “Peaceful farmers“ does not count if the religious rituals involve ritual killings….

Yet everything seems to be done to smooth these type of things over to such an extent that I did believe that the vikings had a gender Utopia, that I did believe that female warriors was a thing & that I did not know that the Viking-culture of the North would in a modern setting make the activities of ISIS seem like kindergarten play in comparison.

Paradise in Viking mythology equals eternal warfare. You drink and you fight, you fight and you drink – where on earth is the advertised “peace?“

Meanwhile you have an assortment of female Gods that for the most part deal with fertility and family life. That does not sound like something that aligns with our current egalitarianism culture.

Just like I did not know this I also did not know that old pagan beliefs systems were ethnocentric in nature, with great emphasis put on location and blood lines.

There is obviously a great deal that we are not being told about when it comes to spirituality and especially our own histories as population groups.

In ignorance darkness triumphs.

 

 

 

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