Creation Myths From The Whole World.

This is a collection of creation myths from throughout the world translated to Norwegian. It was lent to me by a relative who clearly wants me to engage in comparative-religion. This is understandable since we used to be Pagan in Norway before we were Christened by the sword; if you are a believer in universalism I guess it makes sense too.

Universalists, as I’ve come to understand it, think that we are all worshipping the exact same God, but that our different cultures have led us to interpret this deity in different ways.

This theory is refuted when looking at those cultures who worship multiple Gods, in addition to the story lines themselves… 

All of the stories contained within this book are ethnocentric and location-based in nature. You would think that the book had been edited by members of the alt-right since the least race-conscious ideology is dethroned, while all others that are linked to blood-lines and ancestry are exalted.

What becomes obvious is that there are no “globalist religions.“ The closest you get is Christianity which appears unique and groundbreaking in offering a religion open to all regardless of race, ethnicity, location and/or socio-economic status.

Then again; the existence of Nations are acknowledged in the Bible and Christ will come back to judge all the Nations, which means that the abolishment of Nations is not part of the plan.

Yet Christianity comes across as the most inclusive of faiths when reading this book that was lent to me clearly as an act of undermining the status of Christianity.

In this my relative failed once again, mainly because of the fact that I’ve actually read the Holy Bible in full:

“The Old Testament” from the “Holy Bible.”

“The New Testament” from the “Holy Bible.”

If it was up to the book itself I wouldn’t know anything about the Christian faith since the religion is represented by two lone quotes. One at the front and one at the back of the collection; that’s all.

Based on that I would have concluded this entry by saying that Egyptian Sun-worship is what I enjoyed the most, since Christianity certainly doesn’t come off as particularly groundbreaking or special in this context.

Much space is dedicated to all sorts of weird worship traditions completely foreign to the Norwegian people and our culture, with the exception of the Norse creation myth.

After realising the importance of racial/ethnic identity when it comes to religions a thought presented itself to me: what if we summon our ancestral Gods when we pray, regardless of who we think we are praying to?

What if each tribe can only access its God/s and this is completely pre-determined due to the “spirit-wifi“?

My personal favourites were out-takes from the following: Eskimos, The Finns, Native Hopi Americans, the Mayans, Sumerians and Muslims.

What is of interest is that a great number of the myths present the Big Bang theory in ancient wrapping displaying the longevity and widespread acceptance of this belief.

What I found interesting in the Norse creation myth (besides the obvious inspiration for Lord of The Rings) was that female and male Gods were to be seen as equals (at least according to this translation) and that poverty and injustice was lamented, just as in The Old Testament.

The reason as to why this is of great interest is that if old Jewish tribes and old Norse tribes were complaining about this back then, then what makes us think that inequality is a challenge that can ultimately be solved in our time?

When reading the Norse creation myth I saw parallels to Greek mythology as well, which was an interesting detail to note; some of these belief systems overlap in part, but not all of them.

In gender-egalitarianism the Norse myth proved itself unique since all of the other myths would fall under the sexism umbrella in today’s socialist culture.

In the Japanese myth everything goes horribly wrong when a female deity speaks to the male deity first. Order is restored and creation can take place once the feminine submits to the masculine.

The African creation myth is certainly the most entertaining one concerning gender roles, since men and women are described as completely separate entities, and that the men are very puzzled when these alien creatures all of a sudden come into their villages helping themselves to their huts. The men are wondering why these women don’t build their own homes and why they come and live-off the men. This instantly made me think of how women are described in Ancient Greek myths:

Ancient Greek Myths – The Universe, The Gods, And Mortals told by Jean-Pierre Vernant.

Liberalism is described as “an evil that has come upon us“ (to paraphrase) in the Native American texts, which once again echos the laments of the prophets in The Old Testament.

Liberalism was clearly not seen as empowerment in ancient texts but rather as the act of demons and/or evil corrupting society.

The complaints from the people in the Buddhist myth also made me think of The Old Testament, where the Jewish people are reprimanded but repeatedly repeat past mistakes only to lament at the heavens again and again.

One of the myths that was of particular interest was the one from the Mayans. The Gods want to create a being that can worship them. They refer to it as the “human doll.“ They try repeatedly but fail and eventually it is said that the humans of today are linked to the monkeys!

The strangest myth of them all was the Kabbalah one. It only reminded me of the “illuminati confirmed“ sketches on YouTube. Kabbalah is clearly trying to decode the Hebrew language in order to “hack the code,“ gaining access to the assumed programming language of God.

Creation myths are becoming increasingly valid and intriguing when observing our own creation of artificial intelligence and advanced machinery, not that it can surpass what has already been created, but it certainly puts our favourite habit of mimicry into perspective.

Some of the texts were quite boring but I forced myself to read them since reading for pleasure isn’t really my number one reason for doing so.

I read out of curiosity and I also have a policy of reading the books that end up in my possession so that I don’t end up with piles of books that are only for show. This has led me to some horrible reading experiences, but it has also introduced me to different perspectives and stories that I wouldn’t normally have been exposed to.

Reading fiction for example is something that I seldom do. I’m intrigued by works that can either help me or enlighten my curiosity in one way or another, and interestingly enough this has led to inspiration for artistic projects as well.

“The New Testament” from the “Holy Bible.”

There is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out fear.” 1 John 4(18)

At a certain point after venturing into The New Testament, I sent our local priest an email asking if I could purchase the Bible that I had borrowed.

What I had in mind was to highlight my favourite passages after writing notes during my reading of The Old Testament, and to my delight I was told that I could keep the Bible as a gift.

It has a symbolic value to me personally and I love the fact that it is so old and worn that other people have also written their names in it.

The New Testament makes for a remarkably quick read, considering its influence, and consists mainly of Paul’s letters.

I guess this can explain in part people’s fascination with non-canonical gospels, as if thought desperate to find more material regarding what Jesus actually said during his short life-time. Much is made of the fact that few know what Jesus was up to before he was baptised by John The Baptist.

What strikes me as odd when it comes to the Christian faith are all of the various denominations and all of the disagreements that are present within Christianity.

One body – one church.

That was the goal at least, yet that is not how things have played out sadly.

Building bridges between various Christian denominations ought to be a priority if living by the Biblical principle of: one body, one church.

“Now the company of those who believed were of one heart and soul, and no one said that any of  the things which he possessed was his own, but they had everything in common.” Acts 4(32)

“…for there must be factions among you in order that those who are genuine among you may be recognised.” 1 Corinthians 11(19)

There are some misconceptions and malpractice within various Christian denominations that strike me as especially peculiar, considering what The New Testament actually says.

Celibacy among priests, as in Catholicism, is not advocated in The New Testament, quite on the contrary. It is described that Bishops and Deacons need to have orderly households.

It is also mentioned that women involved with the church (even though the role isn’t specified) are meant to be of good, steady character.

Abstaining from alcohol is also not advocated in the Bible. So strict Scandinavian interpretations, where a merciless war is to be fought against wine and spirits, is actually quite off the mark.

Circumcision, so favoured by Americans, is also not advocated in The New Testament. Nor is money worship and/or extreme capitalism. Selfish materialism is at odds with Holy Texts consistently highlighting the importance of collectivism within the church.

“For the love of money is the root of all evils; it is through this craving that some have wandered away from the faith and pierced their hearts with many pangs.” 1 Timothy 6(10)

What I personally struggled with were the sections condemning rebellion against ones government (see Romans 13, Titus 3, Hebrews 13(17), Peter 2(13)). It makes sense if someone loves you and care for you that they wouldn’t be interested in the State coming after you. Then again; the disciples were persecuted and Jesus was killed on the cross due to their rebellion. The disciples and his followers saw Jesus as a fulfilment of Isaiah, but to the Jewish establishment he was the leader of a spiritual revolt, a heresy, that had to be rooted out. The Christian narrative was one that deserved to be squashed to pieces, especially before it reached more people.

The sections concerning slavery, (see Ephesians 6(5), 1 Timothy 6, Titus 2(9), Peter 2(18)) and the whole air that one should be happy in whatever position that one has been born into, fly in the face of the “pursuit of happiness” principle/doctrine; it can also be argued that a slave rebellion is more aligned with justice than accepting physical bondage, at least from a modern perspective.

Yet again, rebellions have a tendency to fail if they aren’t planed well, and the fate of those who are/were dissenters is seldom bright.

The sections concerning women is also at odds with the Western world of today:

“For it is shameful for a woman to speak in church.” 1 Corinthians 14(35)

You can read about women and faith here: “The Gender Agenda” by Lis Goddard & Clare Hendry.

The last aspect of The New Testament that had me wondering was the idea that Abraham’s descendants are the people of faith. This contradicts the Jewish people and their historical obsession with lineage. The Christian perspective is that you are Abraham’s descendant if you are “of him” in spirit.

This is certainly a radical notion, but fits in with other passages in The New Testament concerning a non-Ethnocentric spirituality, that was first intended for “the lost sheep of Israel,” but became accessible to all as Jesus progressed through his mission.

There are several instances where Jesus praises the faith of non-Jewish characters and openly lament those Jews who reject him.

In fact The New Testament can be read as the 2nd rescued operation initiated to save the tribes of Israel. After God’s ranting in The Old Testament, he sends his son, as an incarnation of “The Word” into the world to interact with the Jews. They react to this by killing the one who was sent to save them, driving out his disciples who then do what they can to spread the word to “the Gentiles.”

In killing Jesus the Jewish establishment fulfilled the prophesy and emphasised, in fact confirmed, his Messiah status. Yet there are many today who would still argue that this is/was not the case.

I find it very realistic that humans would react with disbelief if faced with Jesus or anything celestial; humans would either bend the knee or laugh, and even if a miracle was to be performed it would be too far-fetched to expect generation after generation to still believe. Those who witnessed the miracles would know, but how many others? Especially without any tangible, worldly, evidence! That one thing upon which everything rests in this day and age!

I enjoy The Holy Bible’s realistic descriptions of human behaviour.

It is interesting to note for example that Moses is more loyal to his ethnic tribe than to those who adopted him and raised him. He could have lived in luxury and remained comfortable, but decided to throw all of that away in order to fight against social injustice and follow God. (See Hebrews 11(24))

Some of my favourite passages in The New Testament are the ones concerning the celestial:

“For though we live in the world we are not carrying on a worldly war, for the weapons of our warfare are not worldly but have divine power to destroy strongholds.” 2 Corinthians 10(3)

“For we are not contending against flesh and blood, but against the principalities, against the powers, against the world rulers of this present darkness, against the spiritual hosts of wickedness in the heavenly places.” Ephesians 6(12)

Jesus is normally portrayed as an accepting entity, perfectly aligned with our current culture where everything goes, yet the Bible completely contradicts this:

“Do not think that I have come to bring peace on earth; I have not come to bring peace, but a sword. For I have come to set a man against his father, and a daughter against her mother, and a daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law; and a man’s foes will be those of his own household.” Matthew 10(34)

“Every kingdom divided against itself is laid waste, and a divided household falls. And if Satan also is divided against himself, how will his kingdom stand?” Luke 11(17)

“Do you think that I have come to  give peace on earth? No, I tell you, but rather division;” Luke 12(51)

“The world cannot hate you, but it hates me because I testify of it that its works are evil.” John 7(7)

“If you were of the world, the world would love its own; but because you are not of the world, but I chose you out of the world, therefore the world hates you.” John 15(19)

“Do not love the world or the things in the world. If any one loves the world, love for the Father is not in him.” 1 John 2(15)

“We know that we are of God, and the whole world is in the power of the evil one.” 1 John 5(19)

Jesus demands that his disciples leave everything behind in order to follow him:

“So therefore, whoever of you does not renounce all that he has cannot be my disciple.” Luke 14(33)

“…and they sold their possessions and goods and distributed them to all, as any had need.” Acts 2(45)

There are several passages where Jesus orders people to stay quiet about his miracles.

Much emphasis is put on “false prophets,” religious hypocrisy, and showing off:

“Beware of practising your piety before men in order to be seen by them; then you will have no reward from your Father who is in heaven.” Matthew 6

“Beware of false prophets, who come to you in sheep’s clothing but inwardly are ravenous wolves. You will know them by their fruits.” Matthew 7 (15)

“It is written, ‘My house shall be called a house of prayer’; but you make it a den of robbers.” Matthew 21(13)

“So you also outwardly appear righteous to men, but within you are full of hypocrisy and iniquity.” Matthew 23(28)

The Jewish establishment is repeatedly referred to as envious of Jesus’ popularity:

“For he perceived that it was out of envy that the chief priests had delivered him up.” Mark 15(10)

“And the chief priests and the scribes were seeking how to put him to death; for they feared the people.” Luke 22(2)

“This was why the Jews sought all the more to kill him, because he not only broke the sabbath but also called God his own Father, making himself equal with God.” John 5(18)

“Jesus said to them, “Truly, truly, I say to you, before Abraham was, I am.” So they took up stones to throw at him; but Jesus hid himself, and went out of the temple.” John 8(58)

The Jewish establishment go on to persecuted Jesus’ disciples and followers after Jesus’ crucifixion:

“But when the Jews saw the multitudes, they were filled with jealousy, and contradicted what was spoken by Paul and reviled him.” Acts 13(44)

“But the unbelieving Jews stirred up the Gentiles and poisoned their minds against the brethren.” Acts 14(2)

Much is said of people’s blindness since they don’t recognise the prophets among them, not even the Messiah. These passages are some of the most beautiful in the Bible:

“For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, ‘He has a demon’; the Son of man came eating and drinking, and they say, ‘Behold, a glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners!’ Yet wisdom is justified by deeds.” Matthew 11(18)

“O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, killing the prophets and stoning those who are sent to you! How often would I have gathered your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you would not! Behold, your house is forsaken. And I tell you, you will not see me until you say, ‘Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!” Luke 13(34)

“If they do not hear Moses and the prophets, neither will they be convinced if some one should rise from the dead.” Luke 16(31)

Salvation isn’t something that can be bought for money, nor do privilege in this world guarantee privilege in the spiritual world:

“Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick.” Matthew 9(12)

“… and be content with your wages.” Luke 3(14)

“…for a man’s life does not consist in the abundance of his possessions.” Luke 12(15)

“For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.” Luke 12(34)

The New Testament acknowledges diversity and patriotism/tribalism:

“Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptising them in the name of the Father, and the Son and of the Holy Spirit.” Matthew 28(19)

“If any one does not provide for his relatives, and especially for his own family, he has disowned the faith and is worse than an unbeliever.” 1 Timothy 5(8)

 

In Revelation it sounds like God is an eater of men and/or a vampire (see Revelation 14(18)):

“He is not God of the dead, but of the living; you are quite wrong.” Mark 12(27)

“Come, gather for the great supper of God, to eat the flesh of kings, the flesh of captains, the flesh of mighty men, the flesh of horses and their riders, and the flesh of all men, both free and slave, both small and great.” Revelation 19(17)

 

 

 

“The Gender Agenda” by Lis Goddard & Clare Hendry.

This book came into my possession courtesy of our local vicar, who lent it to me after having read my review of “Simply Christian” by Tom Wright.

The work is a discussion between two Christian women regarding female leadership and involvement in the Church.

I can hardly think of a topic more relevant in this day and age where female priests seem to be the only vicars left, in addition to female bishops, even female lesbian bishops!

With the emphasis on LGBTQ and egalitarianism it is certainly surprising to read the actual Holy Bible and see how the texts contrast with our “modern values. ”

In my review of “Simply Christian” I wrote among other things this:

“I’m also questioning the presence of female priests and authority figures within Northern European churches when it is explicitly said in 1 Timothy 2 (12) : “I permit no woman to teach or to have authority over men; she is to keep silent.” I guess it can be counter-argued that women are keeping the faith alive and that it is better with female priests than no priests.”

That is probably a good place to start, because the Holy Bible does certainly not come across as a feminist manifesto, to put it that way, even though Lis Goddard seems to think so.

Her interpretation of The Holy Bible hinges on our Bibles being translated wrong … which means that both my copy of the Bible and Clare Hendry’s copy are faulty.

Lis Goddard zooms in on what could have been the intended or original meaning of certain words in the texts and she also seem to believe that Genesis depicts a gender-neutral Utopia of sorts, before the Fall….

Eve is created from Adam’s rib and God first turns to Adam when Eve has not only been disobedient but has brought her man into disobedience as well. A great deal of people will read this as follows: God created the man first, gave him a companion “of him,” and was upset with Adam when he failed in his leadership, punishing both parties (even the snake).

Lis Goddard and those who agree with her, would claim that there was no such thing as any leadership to begin with. That Adam and Eve were equals, that both were leaders in their own right, but that the Fall distorted this Utopia leading to gender-unbalance, which was finally corrected with the arrival of Jesus Christ and the Kingdom.

My impression after reading “The Gender Agenda” is that joining a Bible reading group might put you into a situation where after staring at certain passages in the Bible for a prolonged period of time, you’ll start seeing all sorts of strange things…Everything that is all of a sudden isn’t and everything that isn’t is.

In other words: if you analyse something long enough you’ll eventually get whatever you desire, seeing your own reflection after turning what you are reading into a mirror.

The same can be observed in a lot of modern journalism.

I’m not saying this to be rude, but the book certainly gives off this vibe and as I result I opened up my Bible again to read Genesis to see what I had missed.

The passage that Goddard and Hendry constantly fall back on doesn’t even occupy a full-page. It is a remarkably short section spanning from Genesis 2 (18)  up until the Fall in Genesis 3. After reading this section again, a couple of times, I find it difficult to agree with Goddard’s interpretation.

A good point made by Hendry is that if a woman is supposed to listen to her husband, and he is the head of the household, then how does that work out if a woman is to be the head of a Church? This might be the reason as to why there were supposed to be male monarchs back in the day. Will a female Queen be “King enough”? Or will she be swayed by her husband as “the head,” in effect meaning that the man is ruling the territory rather than the actual Queen?

Yet with all of this said; it is written in the Bible that women should study, prophesy, and pray, not to forget that there are important female characters present in the Biblical texts which is something that anti-Christian critics wouldn’t acknowledge or downplay. Women are to have a role and be active, the question is how.

An interesting point made in “The Gender Agenda” is that Paul was writing to different Churches, helping them with whatever issues that they were facing. It was also mentioned that women and men were probably seated according to their gender, just like in the synagogues, which can explain why Paul says that women need to be quiet in Church. No gossiping and chit-chat in other words. Here is an interesting quote from 1 Corinthians 9 (22):

“To the weak I became weak, that I might win the weak. I have become all things to all men, that I might by all means save some.”

That quote might shed some light on Paul’s letters. It is also of interest to note that disagreements was a factor from the very beginning of the establishment of the various Churches:

“I appeal to you brethren, by the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that all of you agree and that there be no dissensions among you, but that you be united in the same mind and the same judgement. For it has been reported to me by Chloe’e’s people that there is quarrelling among you, my brethren.” 1 Corinthians 1 (10)

I would recommend reading Goddard & Hendry’s book as it is extremely relevant in today’s Church environment. If you’ve attended any Church services in Scandinavia or the U.K., then you’ll know what I mean.

Reading the Old & New Testament will instantly put you in a situation where you’ll be worried that you’re supporting heresy, which is probably why young people turn to Islam or Orthodox Christianity.

Pluralism and political correctness is hurting Northern churches, who would probably gain more by proclaiming God as the God and the Holy Bible as the Truth. If you start doubting yourself, then others will do as well and in today’s political and spiritual environment, I don’t know if that’s the best way forward.

To conclude; it is certainly at odds with everything in our modern pop-culture to be a practising Christian, especially if you are a woman, since being: argumentative, loud, not modestly dressed and especially having authority over men are all characteristics that are currently being celebrated, in addition to abortion. Nothing gains wider praise than women involved with the military, ministry or politics. So if you are looking at the Bible and Christianity through a conservative lens you’ll probably think that you’ve woken up in Hell, or at least in a world that is in a state of absolute chaos.

I Just Finished The Old Testament!

Why The Bible Is Dangerous & Why The Political Correctness Brigade Wants To Keep It Away From You.

The Lion Encyclopaedia of Jesus.

 

Lent for the 1st time.

Sometime after lent had commenced I decided that maybe I ought to try it, not that I was aware of when it started exactly, as the local church is somewhat neglected by the church authorities and don’t even have a service every Sunday; but that’s ok, the most important thing is that the church hasn’t been closed and is still standing strong, open at all times, after all these years. (It’s Norman and an absolute beauty).

Lent was interesting as it functions like a habit-breaker, I was not entirely successful but at least I gave it a go and tried my best. The biblical reason for this strange “celebration” is that Jesus was wandering around in the desert for a while and withstood temptation from the Devil 😮

I personally have not reached this section of the Bible as I’m still working my way through the Old Testament; I’ve largely been a protestant-in-name-only, (or secular protestant) my entire life, gradually turning to Christianity over the last few years. So lent was pretty new to me (just like attending Holy Communion), but a valuable lesson nonetheless.

The Church of England is struggling greatly; they don’t have enough funds to look after England’s numerous and beautiful places of worship, and most people who I’ve run into complain about dwindling numbers when it comes to attendance.

It is rather sad since England is an Anglican country and so far I have to say that I’ve really enjoyed whatever services I’ve come to; I also heard complaints about general low attendance over in Norway last time I was there. There also seem to be many women who take it upon themselves to keep the faith alive by becoming priests.

The Old Testament is proving a very interesting read as it illustrates how various tribes interact with one another; how everyone travels to Israel to shower the Jews with gifts and praise when they are strong and under tough leadership, while everyone tries to take advantage, looting and conquering the Jews once they are seen as weak! The work is repetitive, as I’ve also written in the very looooong review that I’m writing about it; it is hard to read due to the fact that it was not written to be a page turner. Names of entire Jewish families are listed over and over and over again, which certainly makes for tiresome reading. I therefore decided to check out “The Lion Encyclopaedia of Jesus.,” just to get a more “in-depth” introduction to Jesus; in comparison to what little I already knew.

If you feel like helping persecuted Christians then please read this: “Persecuted Christians around the World.” If you live in England then maybe this will be of interest: “The Vulnerability of the Poor & Our Shared Cultural Heritage.” Here are some interesting petitions to check out: Petitions To Sign & Share.

Here are more books on spirituality & self-help:

“An Angel Saved Me” by Theresa Cheung.

\m/ Spiritus Gladius \m/

The Map of Heaven – by Dr. Eben Alexander & Ptolemy Tompkins.

Spooky Cults, Online Shaming and Alcoholism.

“Don’ts for Weddings” from 1904.

Abortion.

Is Christianity & Islam Compatible?

Patron Saints of Europe.

Intellectual vs. Popular vs. Physical Satanism.

St.Patricks Day a Christian Holiday??????????

A History Magazine from Norway.

Ancient Greek Myths – The Universe, The Gods, And Mortals told by Jean-Pierre Vernant.

The Odyssey – for children.

Boosting Energy So You Can Play More!

The Occult Symbolism of Led Zeppelin

How To Stop Worrying and Start Living by Dale Carnegie.

Willing To Win.

Taking Back Your Time. (goodbye April, hello May)

Bli Best Med Mental Trening by Erik Bertrand Larssen.

The Chimp Paradox.

Live Better & Longer by Michel Cymes.

L’ Art De La Simplicité By Dominique Loreau.

The Clever Guts Diet by Dr. Michael Mosley.

St.Patricks Day a Christian Holiday??????????

I had no idea that St.Patricks day was a religious holiday or had religious roots.

I guess the name should have rung a bell, but all I associate with St.Patricks are crazy outfits, people drinking and “kiss me I’m Irish”.

Don’t get me wrong, it’s great to celebrate your ancestry, and awesome that the Irish are proud of being Irish, I’m just puzzled by the fact that it is originally a festivity to celebrate Christianity’s arrival/rise in popularity in Ireland.

And that Saint Patrick was a……… missionary. Say Whaaaat?

Apparently, Saint Patrick died on this day, so according to tradition the Irish would go to church on the 17th of May (?) , pubs would be closed (??? No Guinness???)

American Irish Immigrants re-invented the holiday. They faced a hard reality in America and wanted to show the world they were proud of their roots ( now that’s awesome!)  and eventually it gave way to a more commercialised celebration. Which is what we see today.

I guess that this is the way most traditional celebrations go. My little brother got a  Disney book for Christmas with, well Christmas stories, and according to these tales, Christmas is all about gifts. I remember sitting there reading this for my brother going…ehhhmm…whaaat? Is this the new official background story for Christmas?

But I guess that this is the way that all “traditions” end up being presented in the end.

So I guess….thumbs up to all of you who are proud to be Irish \m/

……and thumbs up to St.Patrick (?) for driving out the “snakes” (translation: heathens) out of Ireland….?

How would St.Patrick have felt about this holiday turning into a huge drunken binge?

Is it cool or is it not?

Are religious holidays spent celebrating in an old-fashioned style out of date?

Has it become irrelevant or is it more important than ever to know our history? You tell me.

“may you be a half hour in heaven before the devil knows your dead”–apparently an Irish saying, just loved the sound of it. Found it online somewhere 😛