“An Angel Saved Me” by Theresa Cheung.

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This is an eye-opening and potentially unsettling/spooky book, I really enjoyed Cheung’s work as it featured countless stories from people describing supernatural experiences. A common thread can be seen when reading these type of stories. The book stand out though due to its many witness accounts; I really enjoyed its style, I would also recommend:Β The Map of Heaven – by Dr. Eben Alexander & Ptolemy Tompkins.

I’m guessing that spiritual skeptics wouldn’t have much interest in a book such as “An Angel Saved Me,” but if you’ve heard of or experienced anything that resembles what’s within these pages you’ll certainly find it fascinating, like a confirmation of sorts.

I really had no idea that there were people out there communicating with Angels, until I heard that the Norwegian royal princess engages in this sort of activity; I thought it sounded a bit spaced-out at the time, but now I’m not so sure.

I do find it interesting however that all of the Angel encounters described in this work are so positive in nature, it wouldn’t surprise me if there are some vicious celestial beings at work as well; if you believe in the “otherworldly” it could explain the battle between good and evil in our world.

Cheung’s work brings up some points that I’ve certainly come to see as self-evident, something that many alternative doctors also believe in, namely: that we are all connected to a super force and that there is meaning hiding in everything. Some refer to this as “synchronicity.”

Cheung points out the importance of the word and how we can all be angels/helpers to others. I thought a bit about this after reading and my own thoughts about the matter is that: Being the helper of some might make you the enemy of others, but being the helper of some is probably better than being the helper of none.

Let’s say that I pass a homeless person as I’m on my way home. I give this individual whatever change I have and a smile might spread across the person’s face, followed by a “Bless You” or a “Thank You.” It is even better if I then look at the rough sleeper, acknowledging his/her presence, rather than avoiding eye-contact, which is the most comfortable thing to do, as homeless people both remind us of the fragility of existence while maybe giving us a slight sense of “survivors guilt.”

Yet after I’ve done this small act of charity, I walk past another rough-sleeper, and this time I have no change to give. To this individual I represent nothing but another walker-by. Just another one blending into the city-landscape, almost highlighting the beggar’s loneliness and social isolation. Everybody just walk on by lost in their own thoughts about what they need to do, where they ought to be, where they are heading, etc; while ignoring those that they encounter on their way, not even saying “hello,” an act that can only really be seen in villages/hamlets where any human you encounter is automatically special.

This type of scenario or dilemma can be transposed to all political issues as well; I’ll help group A, but then I cannot really help group B, I’ll stand with these people over here, but that will automatically put me in opposition to those guys over there, these people will benefit and a positive change will happen in their lives, but just as this act of good spreads like a ripple effect, there will be a negative one spreading elsewhere within the group that has been ignored or wilfully sidelined.

The power of the word is truly overwhelming if people awaken to it and think about it. This might illustrate why it is complicated: Β “I just had a negative encounter/experience and will now share this with another person.”

  1. I will create a negative atmosphere, because something of a negative nature is being discussed, and since human nature is the way it is; then I’ll probably spend an awful lot of time talking about that which annoys me with my friend/relative.
  2. I will potentially create some sort of conflict, if action is to be taken in order to “get justice” and settle the issue with the other individual who has offended me.
  3. A lot of people let bad individuals get away with their misdeeds, for the simple reason that they don’t want to deal with the negative emotions stemming from a potential argument or conflict, hence the bad guy has a tendency of getting away with whatever.
  4. If you ever try to fix a proper issue, there will be a lot of pain generated in the process, which then makes me wonder if it is best to not address issues; there will of course be no solution to whatever problem, in fact matters might get worse, but at least you’ll post-pone confrontations with troublemakers, or hand the issue at hand over to someone else….It is in fact very common to see this.
  5. If you are to walk in Love and deal with all problems like some guru, then what on earth do you do when encountering real evil and individuals who are rude and mean to everyone around them, without ever improving or showing any signs of genuine remorse? Is a loving nature more likely to get you killed, injured, devastated and/or emotionally drained, or can you actually improve the world by spreading kindness? And how far can this ripple effect potentially go, if you think about the dilemma described above?

These are interesting matters to contemplate indeed, since it deals with our own spiritual footprint here on earth. It is also an interesting thing to note how hate can be born out of absolutely nothing, which is something that can really be experienced by artists receiving hate-mail for no obvious reason or bully victims chosen and picked on by other children, without anyone really knowing why.

There doesn’t have to be any reason for hate to take its hold, and regardless of how well-intended and strong the love that meets it might be, it can’t be denied that a gun might be love’s greatest protector when dealing with deep-seated, blind rage, caused by infernal, putrid, hatred. Why some fall victims to such strong negative emotions, is peculiar indeed, as others can live through inhuman challenges and still find love and a light within, helping them to forgive while ascending to new spiritual heights.

Ours is a strange world.

Quotes from Cheung’s “An Angel Saved Me.”

“But every morning when we wake up we have no idea whether we have years, days or hours left to live. In the midst of life we are in death, whether we like it or not, and we may never know when our time is up.”

“… but when you think about the idea that we are all connected and nothing we do or say is trivial,…”

“Perhaps the genius of artists, musicians and writers, or the joy experienced by lovers or first-time parents, or the explorer soaring to new heights, come close to the inspiration of feeling ‘not of this world.’

“So the next time you experience a ‘coincidence’, rather than dismissing it, ask yourself what it means.”

“…remember that coincidence is the language that angels speak.”

“Remember, if you don’t think you have encountered angels, many of the people here didn’t actually see angels. Something as simple as a feather, a song, a book, a flash of intuition or a remarkable coincidence was the catalyst for their spiritual transformation. If you look at the world with ‘angel eyes’, every moment is a chance for you to glimpse the mystery and to marvel at the sheer magic of it all.”

“…everything we say and do, however tiny or insignificant it may feel at the time, really has the potential to make others feel as if they have been touched by an angel.”

Some books recommended by Theresa Cheung:

The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle

The Secret by Rhonda Byrne.

The Road Less Travelled by M.Scott Peck.

A couple of books about roughly the same topic:

Britain’s X-Traordinary Files by David Clarke.

Haunted! Scariest Stories from the UK’s no.1 Psychic by Derek Acorah