“The Prose Edda“ by Snorri Sturluson.

I’m short of words to describe my gratitude towards all of those people who’ve tirelessly worked to keep our Viking heritage alive.

It is no easy feat considering that what Snorri immortalised in writing were oral traditions. Much have been lost of what once was, but we are lucky and genuinely enriched thanks to individuals like himself.

“The Prose Edda“ is the ultimate guide to Norse mythology and should therefore be mandatory reading for anyone of Scandinavian descent.

I borrowed this classic from my brother who has great taste in books.

When holding it in my hands I feel like I’m looking at a most valuable treasure; I feel humbled, small, grateful, awed, honoured, that this piece of irreplaceable history has found its way to me: an ethnic-Norwegian in 2018.

It’s a flame kept alive against all odds, an echo from a past long gone, but an echo nonetheless that will refuse to die if people of the North keep it close and don’t forget.

It is evidence of the hardships of our ancestors and their battle for survival in a merciless environment.

It is a text that reveal to us who we are and what we come from.

I have to admit that I could not find the much-advertised gender-egalitarianism; it is said that the male and female Gods are to be equally respected, but the male Gods each get an individual description, whereas the female Gods are all lumped into the same category and are clearly representatives of the feminine with their own distinct roles.

When Loki decides to be mean to a Goddess, he misbehaves by shaving off all of her hair, much to the rage of Thor. The transgression is paid for when Loki get the Dwarfs to create magical hair made out of pure gold to the offended party.

Much warfare and toxic-masculinity behaviour is described. The greatest companion to a male God is his battle weapon, for knowledge he might sacrifice an eye or in the name of bravery a hand, a female God on the other hand has to wander the earth in search of her husband, as if thought losing ones man is the greatest loss and sacrifice to a female deity.

The gods are shapeshifters in Norse mythology. They can become anything, and Odin, the  superior chieftain, sees everything like a living embodiment of the CIA, NSA, GCHQ, MI6, MI5 & Google, all assembled into one single, autonomous, being.

The one-eyed God, who sees all.

Much will be recognised from Tolkien when reading through the work such as the names of Dwarfs, a character named Frodi, a cursed ring that brings misfortune upon anyone in possession of it & elves.

The most glorious fate is to die in battle gaining access to Valhalla, a feast hall for warriors who drink ale and fight each other every single day in preparation for the apocalypse, where the Gods will fight and die before the celestial system is born anew and the cycle repeats.

A less glorious fate awaits those who die a natural death of age and disease, going down into the underworld to a stark, formless existence reminiscent of the Greek underworld.

Ancient Greek Myths – The Universe, The Gods, And Mortals told by Jean-Pierre Vernant.

Heimdal (the white god) guards the Bifrost bridge connecting Middle Earth to the realm of the Gods. The rainbow bridge will break with the start of the apocalypse.

Optical illusions are a staple of the gods who dabble in mysticism and magic.

Slaves are mentioned, sacrifice is mentioned in passing without going into any detail, and a whole bunch of intricate old-Norse names are listed in order to immortalise family trees, reminiscent of The Old Testament. 

Those who are wise sit, while those who ask questions and inquire stand. Sitting down is a mark of authority. Another interesting detail to note.

“The Prose Edda“ offers irreplaceable insight into the past of Scandinavia, a sacred knowledge besieged by time and other competing world views.

In order to protect it and pass it on the smartest move would be to memorize it all, so that an oral tradition can keep the words alive when technology fails and we are back to square one.

Creation Myths From The Whole World.

Demons, Movies, Politicians & Bill Gates doing God’s work (according to himself).

This is an old entry that I’ve shortened & edited; I think it is of interest since it touches upon issues that are universal and certainly not unique to our continent or population groups.

You know, the only thing that kills a demon…is love” – Mickey Knox

The Kite Runner” is a movie (and a book) set in Afghanistan depicting the friendship of two young boys from two very different backgrounds. One of them is the servant of the other. The privileged boy ends up fleeing the territory with his father to the U.S.A. when Russians invade Afghanistan. The once distinguished Baba ends up working at a gas station across the pond to provide for himself and his son. In this setting America becomes a place of refuge and hope, not only for them but for other Afghanis as well.

An interesting detail to note in the movie is that Baba doesn’t want to be examined by an American doctor of Russian ancestry, but insists on getting care from someone who hails from the same territory as himself.

“The citizens of Kabul were skeletons now. Skeletons selling naswar in the night market, skeletons drinking cups of strong tea, skeletons playing cards in the moonlight. They greeted me as I passed, teeth clacking together in their jaws. “Salaam, brother,” they said. “Welcome home.”

In the superhero movie “Black Panther we are introduced to a fictional African realm called “Wakanda” whose technological superiority is meant to be kept secret. The movie is actually extremely interesting as it touches upon various topics that you normally don’t come across in the universe of fictitious heroism. One is of course the question of “racial solidarity:” should Wakandans reveal themselves by sharing their secrets with others who have the same skin colour as them? Another one is the character of Killmonger who is genetically Wakandan but who has been raised in America. He is technically an insider, yet he is not since he was raised elsewhere. When his particular configuration is introduced into the African realm he literally starts a civil war in the territory, displaying how dangerous it can be to take in “strangers” even if they are biologically just like you!

This element of  “from us but not like us” is very fascinating to me probably because I was raised as an expat but also since the scenario of being raised “a stranger as a stranger” is becoming increasingly common in Europe as it has been in America since its foundation. “Go back to where you come from!” but where is that exactly? I bring my readership’s attention to Liberia, a most ignored topic and scenario.

“The Americo-Liberian settlers did not relate well to the indigenous peoples they encountered, especially those in communities of the more isolated “bush“. The colonial settlements were raided by the Kru and Grebo from their inland chiefdoms. Americo-Liberians developed as a small elite that held on to political power, and the indigenous tribesmen were excluded from birthright citizenship in their own lands until 1904, in a repetition of the United States’ treatment of Native Americans.[10] The Americo-Liberians promoted religious organizations to set up missions and schools to educate the indigenous peoples.”

It must be a strange situation to find oneself in for sure, to be born a foreigner, yet being legally not due to papers, which is a scenario touched upon in the enjoyable movie “Bend It Like Beckham.

The tale of human suffering and struggle, whether fictional or not, knows no race or  geographical boundaries as the examples from above illustrates. Yet in the light of Nike’s recent commercial featuring Colin Kaepernick and numerous other campaigns that follow a similar vein, a question is left unanswered: what about white people?

An interesting thought experiment would be to take someone like the EU politician Juncker and place him in the context of the two movies described above: 

  • In the 1st scenario he would be an Afghan helping and aiding the Russians in their invasion of Afghanistan. A role that would certainly have depicted him as a villain.
  • In the 2nd scenario he would be an African leader giving away all of Wakanda’s technology and territory to another race. A role that would have him depicted as the worst of the worst.

In both scenarios he would be a traitor, yet in real-life and in the real-world characters like Juncker are depicted as heroes by the mainstream media, while someone who wants secure borders like U.S. President Donald J. Trump or Italian Deputy Prime Minister/Interior Minister Matteo Salvini are depicted as heartless, sociopathic, villains.

The reasons cited for why we should give our continent away as well are poor at best since nobody in the mainstream seem to ever mention that demographics within a territory goes up and down anyway, 2/3 of Norway’s population died during the Black Plague. Norwegians are still around today despite that dramatic drop….

“In addition, recent research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) found nothing to support the assertion that economies are harmed by ageing populations.

“There is no evidence of a negative relationship between ageing and GDP per capita,” academics wrote in a paper entitled ‘Secular Stagnation? The Effect of Aging on Economic Growth in the Age of Automation’.

“On the contrary, the relationship is significantly positive in many specifications,” it adds.

This entry used to be substantially longer with a great number of articles linked into the text. I now seek to shorten it considerably: 

Internal tribalism among various demographics is becoming an increasing issue under the surface in the U.S.A., this is something that I’ve written about after witnessing and experiencing this internal fragmentation myself – now it has started to bleed into mainstream journalism:

Tribalism in the U.S.A.

More about the same topic.

Poverty in England is a huge problem: 14 million Brits live in poverty.

The E.U. are hellbent on uniting Europe and Africa:

Macron

Juncker

Matteo Salvini & Viktor Orban however vocally oppose unification with Africa and are not showing any signs of backing down: 

An anti-EurAfrica front.

“I believe that I’m in government in order to see that our young people have the number of children that they used to a few years ago and not to transplant the best of Africa’s youth to Europe.

“Maybe in Luxembourg they need to do this, but in Italy we need to help people have more children, rather than bring in modern-day slaves (from Africa) to replace the children we’re not having.” – Matteo Salvini

The French authorities are trying to get rid of, or to discredit French politician Marine Le Pen by ordering a psychiatric evaluation. If this is how political opponents are to be treated then we are getting closer to “The Democratic People’s Republic of Europe” everyday.

The desire to forcefully bend others to one’s will is an unhealthy, ever-present wish and endeavour: “We respect your Sovereignty – as long as you do what we want…..”

Salvini is under investigation due to his handling of Italy’s immigration problem. This was an issue back when I used to live there, it only got worse under Berlusconi. It is long overdue that something gets done. 

Salvini rudely interrupted since he wants more Italian children and less Africans.

Meanwhile; here we have Bill Gates who according to himself is doing God’s work. I find this to be an interesting proclamation after scrolling through his social media sites. If he is right, then God has evidently placed his love elsewhere.

The Muslim Council of Britain? British politicians who supported Hungary’s Orban, are now asked to distance themselves from him.

“His comments came after the Muslim Council of Britain said the incident raised fresh concerns about “bigotry in the party”, as the organisation has repeatedly demanded an inquiry into allegations of Islamophobia in Conservative ranks.”

You are an anti-Semite if you don’t like what Soros is doing? You are an Anti-Semite if you are targeting the Jewish people as a group. With the reasoning seen below it makes it impossible to be critical of individuals.

“President Marie van der Zyl said: “As we have stated previously, we are very alarmed by the messages at the heart of Orban’s election campaign, including his comments about ‘Muslim invaders’, calling migrants poison, and the vivid antisemitism in the relentless campaign against Jewish philanthropist George Soros.”

” … within the framework of international norms.” Where do they find these people?

“We place great values on the importance of the rule of law. We hope a resolution can be found that respects a nation’s right to set its own constitutional arrangements within the framework of international norms.”

Young politician Sebastian Kurz is a light in the darkness for sure. Austria doing what is necessary. 

I find it interesting that any person who does not comply with replacement-migration and the fundamental transformation of Europe is instantly lumped into the “far-right” category regardless of political ideology. This shows that it doesn’t matter what your politics or values are as long as you disagree with uniting Africa and Europe. That is apparently the only box that you need to tick in order to get this label. Last time I checked I thought that the E.U. was about establishing peace between the Nations of Europe, clearly I was wrong. 

The U.S.A. will expand its military presence in Greece. 

So with all of those articles pasted in I’m back to where I started, which is how all things go in the end, here is an article about Demons:  “How To Get Rid Of Demons & Demonic Attachments.”

Things That Attract Demons & Signs That Your Home Is Haunted

Possession.

How to engage in Spiritual Warfare.

“Me and you, Wayne, we’re not even the same species. I used to be you; then I evolved. From where you’re standing, you’re a man. From where I’m standing, you’re an ape.” – Mickey Knox

 

“Decoding Da Vinci“ by N.T. Wright

After having read “The Gospel of Thomas” translated by Svein Woje & Kari Klepp., I asked the local vicar if he had any reading material regarding the numerous conspiracies surrounding the Christian church.

He lent me a 28-page pamphlet authored by Rt Revd N.T. Wright.

An interesting question posed by the author to his readership regarding “The Da Vinci Code“ is this: What questions did it raise for you in relation to Christian belief?

I did not have any questions regarding Dan Brown’s claims at all when I first read it for the simple reason that it has become pretty much cannon in Norway that the sanctity of Jesus was decided during the church meeting at Nicea. Norwegians also subscribe to the belief that the books chosen for The New Testament were picked for political reasons, which means that many people in Norway know about the non-canonical gospels and perceive their exclusion as the result of politics.

Since this had already been presented to me as truth repeatedly I saw Dan Brown’s book as a confirmation of an already established fact.

I went out and bought myself “Holy Blood and Holy Grail,“ which I then took as further evidence.

All of this ties neatly together with pop-Satanists and modern pagans who are hard at work to clean up negative PR surrounding their spiritual practises that according to them was/is the result of Christian propaganda.

Due to this it is very difficult to come across books about witchcraft or Satanism that aren’t apologetic in nature….

I sincerely doubt that relevant or good reading material can be found about the topic in any mainstream book shop or at any state funded library….

As a teenager I tried but couldn’t find much of interest.

I was mystified when I read that Jimmy Page apparently had an occult book shop in London once upon a time. Where on earth he could find enough material to justify a book store puzzles me.

All you come across are excuses and attempts at making the Christian churches in Europe look like oppressors making life impossible for other faiths; that of course are always depicted as harmless.

Much emphasis is put on the burning of Witches and what a horrible event this was in human history since there are no such things as witches – just like there are no such things as demons or dark spirits. 

Funny enough this alleged modern “enlightened“ way of looking at things is contradicted by polls where it is claimed that most people claim to have a belief in a God and/or the spiritual, there is no shortage of books about Angels and the paranormal, yet “witches“ or the “spiritual“ is a thing of the past.

Superstition led to the “black-magic-hysteria“ in old-times, now we are simply too smart and too good for these things.

Any modern-day books about spirituality coming from mediums or from anyone who has experienced an NDE will only talk about love, exclusively, without ever mentioning the darker aspects of spiritual experiences; such as hauntings, possessions, poltergeist activity, etc;

The topic of “dark magic“ or “dark spirituality“ can only be found in Hollywood movies, even though spiritual dark activity is well-documented historically. Even if looking at old myths and spiritual beliefs, there was always an acknowledgment of darker elements.

This is remarkably absent from modern-day “everything is just fine“ spirit-literature.

Ironically enough it is relatively easy to buy Tarot cards or Ouija boards or any other tools associated with “magic,“ but books about the topic cannot be found easily unless you are satisfied with the narrative of: “the Church is actually the bad guy and we are really the good guys.“

Satanism also gets a make-over with people claiming that it is all about self-development,  statements that seem dubious when considering the celebration of self-mutilation, suicide, murder and other destructive activities that can be found in so-called alternative circles.

When reading about pagan rituals involving human sacrifice in Nordic cultures in addition to revelations disclosing that the Vikings were very active when it came to slave trading, the modern myth of pagan-Scandinavia being peaceful, tolerant, egalitarian, and whatnot becomes dubious at best.

“Peaceful traders“ does not count if it involves the kidnapping and selling of other humans (a capital accumulated due to merciless raids and plundering), “Peaceful farmers“ does not count if the religious rituals involve ritual killings….

Yet everything seems to be done to smooth these type of things over to such an extent that I did believe that the vikings had a gender Utopia, that I did believe that female warriors was a thing & that I did not know that the Viking-culture of the North would in a modern setting make the activities of ISIS seem like kindergarten play in comparison.

Paradise in Viking mythology equals eternal warfare. You drink and you fight, you fight and you drink – where on earth is the advertised “peace?“

Meanwhile you have an assortment of female Gods that for the most part deal with fertility and family life. That does not sound like something that aligns with our current egalitarianism culture.

Just like I did not know this I also did not know that old pagan beliefs systems were ethnocentric in nature, with great emphasis put on location and blood lines.

There is obviously a great deal that we are not being told about when it comes to spirituality and especially our own histories as population groups.

In ignorance darkness triumphs.

 

 

 

Creation Myths From The Whole World.

This is a collection of creation myths from throughout the world translated to Norwegian. It was lent to me by a relative who clearly wants me to engage in comparative-religion. This is understandable since we used to be Pagan in Norway before we were Christened by the sword; if you are a believer in universalism I guess it makes sense too.

Universalists, as I’ve come to understand it, think that we are all worshipping the exact same God, but that our different cultures have led us to interpret this deity in different ways.

This theory is refuted when looking at those cultures who worship multiple Gods, in addition to the story lines themselves… 

All of the stories contained within this book are ethnocentric and location-based in nature. You would think that the book had been edited by members of the alt-right since the least race-conscious ideology is dethroned, while all others that are linked to blood-lines and ancestry are exalted.

What becomes obvious is that there are no “globalist religions.“ The closest you get is Christianity which appears unique and groundbreaking in offering a religion open to all regardless of race, ethnicity, location and/or socio-economic status.

Then again; the existence of Nations are acknowledged in the Bible and Christ will come back to judge all the Nations, which means that the abolishment of Nations is not part of the plan.

Yet Christianity comes across as the most inclusive of faiths when reading this book that was lent to me clearly as an act of undermining the status of Christianity.

In this my relative failed once again, mainly because of the fact that I’ve actually read the Holy Bible in full:

“The Old Testament” from the “Holy Bible.”

“The New Testament” from the “Holy Bible.”

If it was up to the book itself I wouldn’t know anything about the Christian faith since the religion is represented by two lone quotes. One at the front and one at the back of the collection; that’s all.

Based on that I would have concluded this entry by saying that Egyptian Sun-worship is what I enjoyed the most, since Christianity certainly doesn’t come off as particularly groundbreaking or special in this context.

Much space is dedicated to all sorts of weird worship traditions completely foreign to the Norwegian people and our culture, with the exception of the Norse creation myth.

After realising the importance of racial/ethnic identity when it comes to religions a thought presented itself to me: what if we summon our ancestral Gods when we pray, regardless of who we think we are praying to?

What if each tribe can only access its God/s and this is completely pre-determined due to the “spirit-wifi“?

My personal favourites were out-takes from the following: Eskimos, The Finns, Native Hopi Americans, the Mayans, Sumerians and Muslims.

What is of interest is that a great number of the myths present the Big Bang theory in ancient wrapping displaying the longevity and widespread acceptance of this belief.

What I found interesting in the Norse creation myth (besides the obvious inspiration for Lord of The Rings) was that female and male Gods were to be seen as equals (at least according to this translation) and that poverty and injustice was lamented, just as in The Old Testament.

The reason as to why this is of great interest is that if old Jewish tribes and old Norse tribes were complaining about this back then, then what makes us think that inequality is a challenge that can ultimately be solved in our time?

When reading the Norse creation myth I saw parallels to Greek mythology as well, which was an interesting detail to note; some of these belief systems overlap in part, but not all of them.

In gender-egalitarianism the Norse myth proved itself unique since all of the other myths would fall under the sexism umbrella in today’s socialist culture.

In the Japanese myth everything goes horribly wrong when a female deity speaks to the male deity first. Order is restored and creation can take place once the feminine submits to the masculine.

The African creation myth is certainly the most entertaining one concerning gender roles, since men and women are described as completely separate entities, and that the men are very puzzled when these alien creatures all of a sudden come into their villages helping themselves to their huts. The men are wondering why these women don’t build their own homes and why they come and live-off the men. This instantly made me think of how women are described in Ancient Greek myths:

Ancient Greek Myths – The Universe, The Gods, And Mortals told by Jean-Pierre Vernant.

Liberalism is described as “an evil that has come upon us“ (to paraphrase) in the Native American texts, which once again echos the laments of the prophets in The Old Testament.

Liberalism was clearly not seen as empowerment in ancient texts but rather as the act of demons and/or evil corrupting society.

The complaints from the people in the Buddhist myth also made me think of The Old Testament, where the Jewish people are reprimanded but repeatedly repeat past mistakes only to lament at the heavens again and again.

One of the myths that was of particular interest was the one from the Mayans. The Gods want to create a being that can worship them. They refer to it as the “human doll.“ They try repeatedly but fail and eventually it is said that the humans of today are linked to the monkeys!

The strangest myth of them all was the Kabbalah one. It only reminded me of the “illuminati confirmed“ sketches on YouTube. Kabbalah is clearly trying to decode the Hebrew language in order to “hack the code,“ gaining access to the assumed programming language of God.

Creation myths are becoming increasingly valid and intriguing when observing our own creation of artificial intelligence and advanced machinery, not that it can surpass what has already been created, but it certainly puts our favourite habit of mimicry into perspective.

Some of the texts were quite boring but I forced myself to read them since reading for pleasure isn’t really my number one reason for doing so.

I read out of curiosity and I also have a policy of reading the books that end up in my possession so that I don’t end up with piles of books that are only for show. This has led me to some horrible reading experiences, but it has also introduced me to different perspectives and stories that I wouldn’t normally have been exposed to.

Reading fiction for example is something that I seldom do. I’m intrigued by works that can either help me or enlighten my curiosity in one way or another, and interestingly enough this has led to inspiration for artistic projects as well.

Confirmation.

Yesterday my sister & I were confirmed by The Bishop of Tewkesbury.

I really enjoyed the event and look forward to deepen my spirituality further in the coming years.

After a year of working my way through The Holy Bible this was a wonderful way to finalise this part of my spiritual journey. I’m so happy that I was joined by my sister! 🙂

It was a wonderful evening. ❤

IMG_1316

 

“The New Testament” from the “Holy Bible.”

There is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out fear.” 1 John 4(18)

At a certain point after venturing into The New Testament, I sent our local priest an email asking if I could purchase the Bible that I had borrowed.

What I had in mind was to highlight my favourite passages after writing notes during my reading of The Old Testament, and to my delight I was told that I could keep the Bible as a gift.

It has a symbolic value to me personally and I love the fact that it is so old and worn that other people have also written their names in it.

The New Testament makes for a remarkably quick read, considering its influence, and consists mainly of Paul’s letters.

I guess this can explain in part people’s fascination with non-canonical gospels, as if thought desperate to find more material regarding what Jesus actually said during his short life-time. Much is made of the fact that few know what Jesus was up to before he was baptised by John The Baptist.

What strikes me as odd when it comes to the Christian faith are all of the various denominations and all of the disagreements that are present within Christianity.

One body – one church.

That was the goal at least, yet that is not how things have played out sadly.

Building bridges between various Christian denominations ought to be a priority if living by the Biblical principle of: one body, one church.

“Now the company of those who believed were of one heart and soul, and no one said that any of  the things which he possessed was his own, but they had everything in common.” Acts 4(32)

“…for there must be factions among you in order that those who are genuine among you may be recognised.” 1 Corinthians 11(19)

There are some misconceptions and malpractice within various Christian denominations that strike me as especially peculiar, considering what The New Testament actually says.

Celibacy among priests, as in Catholicism, is not advocated in The New Testament, quite on the contrary. It is described that Bishops and Deacons need to have orderly households.

It is also mentioned that women involved with the church (even though the role isn’t specified) are meant to be of good, steady character.

Abstaining from alcohol is also not advocated in the Bible. So strict Scandinavian interpretations, where a merciless war is to be fought against wine and spirits, is actually quite off the mark.

Circumcision, so favoured by Americans, is also not advocated in The New Testament. Nor is money worship and/or extreme capitalism. Selfish materialism is at odds with Holy Texts consistently highlighting the importance of collectivism within the church.

“For the love of money is the root of all evils; it is through this craving that some have wandered away from the faith and pierced their hearts with many pangs.” 1 Timothy 6(10)

What I personally struggled with were the sections condemning rebellion against ones government (see Romans 13, Titus 3, Hebrews 13(17), Peter 2(13)). It makes sense if someone loves you and care for you that they wouldn’t be interested in the State coming after you. Then again; the disciples were persecuted and Jesus was killed on the cross due to their rebellion. The disciples and his followers saw Jesus as a fulfilment of Isaiah, but to the Jewish establishment he was the leader of a spiritual revolt, a heresy, that had to be rooted out. The Christian narrative was one that deserved to be squashed to pieces, especially before it reached more people.

The sections concerning slavery, (see Ephesians 6(5), 1 Timothy 6, Titus 2(9), Peter 2(18)) and the whole air that one should be happy in whatever position that one has been born into, fly in the face of the “pursuit of happiness” principle/doctrine; it can also be argued that a slave rebellion is more aligned with justice than accepting physical bondage, at least from a modern perspective.

Yet again, rebellions have a tendency to fail if they aren’t planed well, and the fate of those who are/were dissenters is seldom bright.

The sections concerning women is also at odds with the Western world of today:

“For it is shameful for a woman to speak in church.” 1 Corinthians 14(35)

You can read about women and faith here: “The Gender Agenda” by Lis Goddard & Clare Hendry.

The last aspect of The New Testament that had me wondering was the idea that Abraham’s descendants are the people of faith. This contradicts the Jewish people and their historical obsession with lineage. The Christian perspective is that you are Abraham’s descendant if you are “of him” in spirit.

This is certainly a radical notion, but fits in with other passages in The New Testament concerning a non-Ethnocentric spirituality, that was first intended for “the lost sheep of Israel,” but became accessible to all as Jesus progressed through his mission.

There are several instances where Jesus praises the faith of non-Jewish characters and openly lament those Jews who reject him.

In fact The New Testament can be read as the 2nd rescued operation initiated to save the tribes of Israel. After God’s ranting in The Old Testament, he sends his son, as an incarnation of “The Word” into the world to interact with the Jews. They react to this by killing the one who was sent to save them, driving out his disciples who then do what they can to spread the word to “the Gentiles.”

In killing Jesus the Jewish establishment fulfilled the prophesy and emphasised, in fact confirmed, his Messiah status. Yet there are many today who would still argue that this is/was not the case.

I find it very realistic that humans would react with disbelief if faced with Jesus or anything celestial; humans would either bend the knee or laugh, and even if a miracle was to be performed it would be too far-fetched to expect generation after generation to still believe. Those who witnessed the miracles would know, but how many others? Especially without any tangible, worldly, evidence! That one thing upon which everything rests in this day and age!

I enjoy The Holy Bible’s realistic descriptions of human behaviour.

It is interesting to note for example that Moses is more loyal to his ethnic tribe than to those who adopted him and raised him. He could have lived in luxury and remained comfortable, but decided to throw all of that away in order to fight against social injustice and follow God. (See Hebrews 11(24))

Some of my favourite passages in The New Testament are the ones concerning the celestial:

“For though we live in the world we are not carrying on a worldly war, for the weapons of our warfare are not worldly but have divine power to destroy strongholds.” 2 Corinthians 10(3)

“For we are not contending against flesh and blood, but against the principalities, against the powers, against the world rulers of this present darkness, against the spiritual hosts of wickedness in the heavenly places.” Ephesians 6(12)

Jesus is normally portrayed as an accepting entity, perfectly aligned with our current culture where everything goes, yet the Bible completely contradicts this:

“Do not think that I have come to bring peace on earth; I have not come to bring peace, but a sword. For I have come to set a man against his father, and a daughter against her mother, and a daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law; and a man’s foes will be those of his own household.” Matthew 10(34)

“Every kingdom divided against itself is laid waste, and a divided household falls. And if Satan also is divided against himself, how will his kingdom stand?” Luke 11(17)

“Do you think that I have come to  give peace on earth? No, I tell you, but rather division;” Luke 12(51)

“The world cannot hate you, but it hates me because I testify of it that its works are evil.” John 7(7)

“If you were of the world, the world would love its own; but because you are not of the world, but I chose you out of the world, therefore the world hates you.” John 15(19)

“Do not love the world or the things in the world. If any one loves the world, love for the Father is not in him.” 1 John 2(15)

“We know that we are of God, and the whole world is in the power of the evil one.” 1 John 5(19)

Jesus demands that his disciples leave everything behind in order to follow him:

“So therefore, whoever of you does not renounce all that he has cannot be my disciple.” Luke 14(33)

“…and they sold their possessions and goods and distributed them to all, as any had need.” Acts 2(45)

There are several passages where Jesus orders people to stay quiet about his miracles.

Much emphasis is put on “false prophets,” religious hypocrisy, and showing off:

“Beware of practising your piety before men in order to be seen by them; then you will have no reward from your Father who is in heaven.” Matthew 6

“Beware of false prophets, who come to you in sheep’s clothing but inwardly are ravenous wolves. You will know them by their fruits.” Matthew 7 (15)

“It is written, ‘My house shall be called a house of prayer’; but you make it a den of robbers.” Matthew 21(13)

“So you also outwardly appear righteous to men, but within you are full of hypocrisy and iniquity.” Matthew 23(28)

The Jewish establishment is repeatedly referred to as envious of Jesus’ popularity:

“For he perceived that it was out of envy that the chief priests had delivered him up.” Mark 15(10)

“And the chief priests and the scribes were seeking how to put him to death; for they feared the people.” Luke 22(2)

“This was why the Jews sought all the more to kill him, because he not only broke the sabbath but also called God his own Father, making himself equal with God.” John 5(18)

“Jesus said to them, “Truly, truly, I say to you, before Abraham was, I am.” So they took up stones to throw at him; but Jesus hid himself, and went out of the temple.” John 8(58)

The Jewish establishment go on to persecuted Jesus’ disciples and followers after Jesus’ crucifixion:

“But when the Jews saw the multitudes, they were filled with jealousy, and contradicted what was spoken by Paul and reviled him.” Acts 13(44)

“But the unbelieving Jews stirred up the Gentiles and poisoned their minds against the brethren.” Acts 14(2)

Much is said of people’s blindness since they don’t recognise the prophets among them, not even the Messiah. These passages are some of the most beautiful in the Bible:

“For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, ‘He has a demon’; the Son of man came eating and drinking, and they say, ‘Behold, a glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners!’ Yet wisdom is justified by deeds.” Matthew 11(18)

“O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, killing the prophets and stoning those who are sent to you! How often would I have gathered your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you would not! Behold, your house is forsaken. And I tell you, you will not see me until you say, ‘Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!” Luke 13(34)

“If they do not hear Moses and the prophets, neither will they be convinced if some one should rise from the dead.” Luke 16(31)

Salvation isn’t something that can be bought for money, nor do privilege in this world guarantee privilege in the spiritual world:

“Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick.” Matthew 9(12)

“… and be content with your wages.” Luke 3(14)

“…for a man’s life does not consist in the abundance of his possessions.” Luke 12(15)

“For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.” Luke 12(34)

The New Testament acknowledges diversity and patriotism/tribalism:

“Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptising them in the name of the Father, and the Son and of the Holy Spirit.” Matthew 28(19)

“If any one does not provide for his relatives, and especially for his own family, he has disowned the faith and is worse than an unbeliever.” 1 Timothy 5(8)

 

In Revelation it sounds like God is an eater of men and/or a vampire (see Revelation 14(18)):

“He is not God of the dead, but of the living; you are quite wrong.” Mark 12(27)

“Come, gather for the great supper of God, to eat the flesh of kings, the flesh of captains, the flesh of mighty men, the flesh of horses and their riders, and the flesh of all men, both free and slave, both small and great.” Revelation 19(17)